Posts Tagged ‘WordPress’

How to Use Hash Tags?

How to Use Twitter Hashtags #

Hashtags signify that a Tweet belongs to a particular conversation on Twitter. Like tags on Flickr or blogs, hashtags group Tweets together, even if the Tweeters are not in the same network. By organizing tweets around a hashtag, users following and participating in a conversation can find all Tweets about that subject by searching.
To signify a tag, place a hash symbol (#) before a description within a Tweet. Hashtags can be used for an ongoing trend (#followfriday lets users suggest interesting people to their network that may be worth following) or a single event (#superbowl).

Identifying a Hashtag

Hashtags can be used to organize conversations around a particular event (conferences, a television program) or a popular topic of conversation (the Iran election, balloon boy). Twitter.com publishes the most talked about topics on their homepage. Twubs.com and Hashtag.org offer lists of widely used hashtags. While tags can often be difficult to define, services like Tagalus or What The Trend offer brief definitions of popular tags.

Starting a Hashtag
1.
Select a short and simple tag. (#SEO, #followfriday) A hashtag does take up characters in your Tweet, so choose something clear, yet snappy. Search Twitter for your chosen tag to see if it already exists. If it exists and relates to your idea, consider using the same tag to widen the audience. Otherwise, alter your tag for your specific needs.
2.
Establish the hashtag in a Tweet. Give the hashtag context – tell your users how and when to use the tag. If the hashtag will be used for a time sensitive event, announce the hashtag a day or so beforehand to alert your followers that the tag exists. Don’t forget to use the actual tag at the end of the Tweet.
3.
Use the hashtag in the lead-up to the event so followers understand the use of the particular tag.

Tracking a Hashtag

Once a hashtag is in place, it is important to see who else is using it.
You can watch a conversation that uses a hashtag by searching for the tag on using Twitter Search. Search results will show those Tweeters using the hashtag, even if you do not follow them directly.

Make a widget of the search results so that followers engaged in the conversation can easily see the Tweet stream.

Many Twitter applications (such as TweetDeck or Seesmic) offer an option to create a list based on a hashtag, so the tagged conversation can live next to the other Tweet streams you already read.

You may also track your tag (or popular trend tags) using services like Monitter or TwitterFall. These sites are best for watching trending topics, rather than smaller tag use.

Try Search for: #bizbuzz #social #blogs #twitter #networking #infotechusa #wordpress … on twitter

Using hashtags

Although not terribly complicated, hashtags have some unwritten rules. The primary one to remember: don’t overuse them. If every one of your tweets IS a hashtag, you dilute the usefulness of them by fragmenting the conversation. In addition, many people will shy away from you because it seems spammy.

Another simple tip: give your hashtag context. Most people won’t actually know what your hashtag means, so give a quick explanation in one of your tweets or, if you’re making a hashtag, make it very apparent what it’s talking about.

If you’re looking to create a hashtag, be sure that it adds value for yourself and your followers. The best way to utilize them is when you need to organize information. Conferences, major events, and even reminders (i.e. #todo) can help organize specific tweets and make life easier on you and your followers.

WordPress Features Overview

WordPress Features Overview

Content Management System Overview WordPress

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* Full standards compliance — We have gone to great lengths to make sure every bit of WordPress generated code is in full compliance with the standards of the W3C. This is important not only for interoperability with today’s browser but also for forward compatibility with the tools of the next generation. Your web site is a beautiful thing, and you should demand nothing less.

* No rebuilding — Changes you make to your templates or entries are reflected immediately on your site, with no need for regenerating static pages.

* WordPress Pages — Pages allow you to manage non-blog content easily, so for example you could have a static "About" page that you manage through WordPress. For an idea of how powerful this is, the entire WordPress.org site could be run off WordPress alone. (We don’t for technical mirroring reasons.)
* WordPress Links — Links allows you to create, maintain, and update any number of blogrolls through your administration interface. This is much faster than calling an external blogroll manager.

* WordPress Themes — WordPress comes with a full theme system which makes designing everything from the simplest blog to the most complicated webzine a piece of cake, and you can even have multiple themes with totally different looks that you switch with a single click. Have a new design every day.

* Cross-blog communication tools— WordPress fully supports both the Trackback and Pingback standards, and we are committed to supporting future standards as they develop.
* Comments — Visitors to your site can leave comments on individual entries, and through Trackback or Pingback can comment on their own site. You can enable or disable comments on a per-post basis.

* Spam protection — Out of the box WordPress comes with very robust tools such as an integrated blacklist and open proxy checker to manage and eliminate comment spam on your blog, and there is also a rich array of plugins that can take this functionality a step further.

* Full user registration — WordPress has a built-in user registration system that (if you choose) can allow people to register and maintain profiles and leave authenticated comments on your blog. You can optionally close comments for non-registered users. There are also plugins that hide posts from lower level users. (find out more: www.wordpress.com)